You’ve done it before, just like most people who drive: You see that someone texted you and send them back a message. Maybe you did it at a stoplight, stop sign or when you were the only person on the roads, but the reality is that texting and driving is a hazard at any time.

Texting is one of the worst distractions because of its ability to take your mind off the road, your hands off the wheel and your eyes away from what’s ahead of you. Even if you’re the only person on the roads for miles, you still run the risk of driving off the roadway, hitting a pothole or colliding with an animal that crosses into your path. There’s simply no safe time to text and drive.

Knowing this, why do so many still text and drive?

Despite the risks, some people continue to text and drive for a few reasons. One is that texting has become a normal part of life. People are used to immediate responses and constant conversations. Even though texting is dangerous, some believe that responding is more important than looking away from the road for a few seconds.

Sadly, texting and driving slows down response times and makes drivers hazardous to themselves and others. In one study, it was shown that while driving at 35 mph, a driver’s reaction time worsened to .57 seconds from .45 seconds when texting. When driving under the influence, the driver’s reaction was impaired at .46 instead of .45 seconds, showing just how dangerous texting really is.

Texting and driving causes crashes that lead to injuries and fatalities. If you’re impacted by a texting driver’s recklessness, you can hold them accountable.