No one dies of a back injury at work. Yet, back injuries do cause “a significant amount of human suffering, loss of productivity, and economic burden on compensation systems,” according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

You have probably suffered a back injury at some point in your life, even if you shrugged it off as a sore back. It is easy to think of an injury as a one-off event. You could injure your back lifting a too heavy load, falling from a ladder or crashing while driving deliveries. More likely, though, your back injury built up over time, and you did not notice the early signs.

Unless you lead an exceptionally diverse work life, you likely repeat the same movements and positions day after day:

  • If you are an office worker, you slouch at your keyboard in the same office chair week after week.
  • If you are a scaffolder, you reach down and lift the same steel poles and twist to put them into the same positions repeatedly.

Even if you spend your days jetting across the world as an air hostess, your routine is not that varied. Push heavy trolley up and down the aisle, bending and reaching to deliver and collect food trays. Stand on tiptoes to push a heavy bag into overhead cabin then take it out again.

A series of little traumas caused by the movements and positions required by your job weaken your back over time. Then one day, the cumulative effects leave you in agony, or unable to work. Fortunately, Oklahoma employers should have worker’s compensation insurance to help you out. If your initial claim is denied, consider speaking with an attorney before filing your appeal.